Restoring Independence Supporting Empowerment

About R.I.S.E.

The simple tasks of everyday life – climbing stairs, reaching a high shelf, driving to the grocery store – are easy to take for granted. Because they're done without a second thought, it's impossible to imagine an inability to perform them. But that's often the reality for our severely wounded heroes, where basic tasks are impossible obstacles and the enduring ambition of rehabilitation is to achieve a semblance of normalcy.


Adapted Vehicles, Modified Homes, Wheelchairs & Trackchairs

R.I.S.E. was established to provide wounded heroes and their families with the necessary resources to overcome their new life challenges. Whether providing home modifications, adapted vehicles, wheelchairs/trackchairs or constructing one-of-a-kind custom Smart Homes, the Gary Sinise Foundation is committed to helping our wounded heroes increase their mobility and reclaim their self-reliance.


Smart Homes
Through R.I.S.E., we're proudly building Smart Homes
for our nation's most severely wounded heroes. 

Why Smart Homes?

All of our warriors encounter difficulties when they return to civilian life, but these heroes face unimaginable life changes. Help us honor their incredible service to our country with a new Smart Home, customized to ease the day-to-day challenges they now face. Features like retractable cooktops, cabinets and shelving, automated lighting, heating, air-conditioning and window treatments controlled by an iPad, as well as elevators, roll-in bathrooms, front-load washers and dryers, intercom systems and automated doors can help restore their independence in countless ways.

Building for America's Bravest
We're also building custom Smart Homes through our Building for America's Bravest partner program with Tunnel to Towers Foundation.


Tour A Completed Smart Home


By the end of 2014
we will have begun construction preparations,
broken ground, or completed

28
Smart Homes across the country

Meet Our Heroes

  • Brendan Morroco

    US Army SGT
    Brendan
    Marrocco

    Home Status:**
    Completed

    In 2009, during the early hours of Easter Sunday, Brendan Marrocco was returning to base in Iraq from a night mission in an armored vehicle. He tripped a roadside bomb. The blast took Brendan’s arms and legs, severed his left carotid artery, broke his nose as well as his left eye socket and facial bones, left shrapnel in the left eye and severe burns on his neck and face.

    “Any one of his injuries was life-threatening,” Major Jayson Aydelotte, the trauma surgeon told the New York Times. “It’s incredible.” Marrocco is the first US soldier to survive quadruple amputation. When asked if he had any regrets about serving our country, Brendan said without hesitation— “No way. There is not a part of me that would change anything that happened. I would go back today and do the same thing all over again. I wish there was a way I could stay in the infantry and keep fighting with my brothers.”
  • Todd Nicely

    USMC Cpl.
    Todd
    Nicely

    Home Status:**
    Completed

    On March 26, 2010, Cpl. Nicely was leading his 1st Squad infantrymen back from a security patrol in Afghanistan. Just as he began to cross the bridge, he stepped on a pressure plate mine. Todd lost all his limbs from the blast. Todd’s humble reflection on his injury are remarkable. “I consider myself pretty lucky,” he said. “I wake up every morning and figure I have a second chance at life. So I get up and go.”

    Todd and his wife Crystal are both Marines and the quintessential Semper Fidelis couple. They have learned together what it means to embody the Marine motto — Always Faithful. Anyone who has the pleasure of meeting Todd and Crystal will be moved by their remarkable love of their country and each other.
  • John Peck

    USMC Sgt.
    John
    Peck

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    During his second tour of duty with the Marines, Sgt. John Peck was wounded while serving in Afgahnistan. On May 24, 2010, an improvised explosive device (IED) took both of his legs and his left arm. He later battle infections that ultimately took his right arm as well.

    This was Peck’s second injury from an IED, having suffered a traumatic brain injury two years earlier. After he had recovered, Peck immediately rejoined his brothers in combat. Peck is a Marine through and through. “Something told me, you can’t die yet, you have work to do,” he said. Speaking about his injuries he added, “There’s always someone worse off. I just look forward.”
  • Juan Dominguez

    USMC Cpl.
    Juan
    Dominguez

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    On October 23, 2010, while on patrol, Cpl. Juan Dominguez slipped down a small embankment. He landed on a buried bomb. The blast could be heard for miles. His legs were severed above the knee and his right arm was too mangled to save. In the first moment he awoke from his coma, he said to his nurse, “Don’t be sad for me, m’am. I would do it again for my country.”

    Juan’s grit, determination and spirit serves as an inspiration to his fellow injured servicemen and women. One thing is certain, Juan has no regrets. “My injuries that I sustained in Afghanistan against the enemy forces were well worth it,” he said. “I love this country.”
  • Todd Love

    USMC Cpl.
    Todd
    Love

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    Cpl. Todd Love was point man on foot patrol in Afghanistan the morning of October 25, 2010 when he triggered an IED. The explosion took both of his legs and ultimately his left arm. Todd recounts that although he was severely wounded, he felt God was with him the whole time.

    In an interview, Todd said he has been humbled by all the prayers he has received. “I’ve gained more than I’ve lost,” Love said. “I’ve had to evolve to survive. I have changed a lot. I’ve had to grow up. At the same time, I have had to be like a little child. I’ve had to relearn everything and rely on others.”
  • Adam Keys

    US Army SGT
    Adam
    Keys

    Home Status:*
    Design Phase

    Army Sgt. Adam Keys lost both legs and his left arm after a roadside bomb exploded on July 14th, 2010 in Afghanistan. Adam would later learn the bomb took the lives of four soldiers including his best friend. Adam’s journey since July 14th has been life threatening on many occasions. He suffered brain injury and broken bones when his truck was struck by the bomb, however, it was an infection in his blood stream that ultimately resulted in the loss of his limbs. He “coded” several times and had to be brought back to life.

    He has survived over 100 surgeries as well as the strenuous and endless days of rehabilitation. In an interview, Adam stated that he envisions himself one day joining the men at Fort Bragg for a seven mile Long Street run, once again hearing the cadence as they run. “Little by little, I’m getting there. One of these days, I’ll get out of here,” Adam said, “You have to be positive.”
  • Tyler Huffman

    USMC Cpl.
    Tyler
    Huffman

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    A husband and father, Cpl. Tyler Huffman was asked in an interview what he’d like people to know about being a Marine. “That freedom is not free, it has a price. It always has and always will.” On December 3, 2010, while protecting our freedom in Afghanistan, Tyler was shot twice in the chest. The injuries he sustained as a result left him paralyzed.

    Tyler’s love of country and thoughts on being an American are an inspiration. “We are the greatest and most blessed nation and we take too many things for granted. If Americans had a clue what it was like to live in other parts of the world, we would truly realize what a blessed nation we really are.”
  • J.B. Kerns

    USMC Cpl.
    J.B.
    Kerns

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    JB Kerns, a combat engineer, was on a mine sweep in a safety zone, on April 7, 2011 in Afghanistan. In one second, his third tour of duty took a catastrophic turn; JB lost three of his limbs and sustained other serious injuries to his chest and groin areas from shrapnel from an IED that detonated.

    Since that explosion, JB was brought back to the United States for treatment at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. He has undergone extensive surgeries and strenuous daily physical and occupational therapy.

    JB’s Aunt, Jennifer Hall, shared that, “He loves America. Josh has always fought for what he thought was right.” To the hundreds of motorcyclists, and the residents of JB’s hometown who greeted him with waving flags, JB told them, “It feels really good to be home. It is an honor.”
  • BFAB_BryanDilberian

    US Army SPC
    Bryan
    Dilberian

    Home Status:*
    Pre-Planning

    On July 1, 2011, Bryan, a gutsy Brooklyn boy, began the fight of his life. While on a routine patrol in Afghanistan an improvised explosive device (IED) exploded. Instantly, Bryan’s best friend, Pfc. Jimmy Waters, was killed. In that moment, Bryan was also hit by shrapnel and critically wounded.

    His battle began. On the field he was given first aid, and with 4 days journeyed to Kandahar, Germany, and then home to the United States. Initially, Bryan lost an enormous amount of blood, but miraculously the fighter in him held on. Bryan lost both legs below the knee and his left arm below the elbow.

    Ten days after his initial surgery in the new battlefield of Walter Reed Hospital, SPC Bryan Dilberian got himself up and dragged himself (IV poles and all) to the Physical Therapy Unit and began to fight his way back. In an interview, Bryan stated, “They can take my legs, but they can’t take my pride.”

    One thing that does not need fixing is his incredible fighting spirit. The courage he has displayed is remarkable. In an interview for the Daily News, Bryan said he doesn’t second-guess his decision. “I would do it a million times over,” he said. “There’s nothing to regret about it. I did something for the country and I’m proud of myself.
  • Joseph Wilkinson

    US Air Force TSgt.
    Joe
    Wilkinson

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    Tech Sgt. Joseph Wilkinson was a member of Security Forces for the United States Air Force. His tours of duty involved both Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Joe is the father of three, who finds himself in a humbling and disheartening circumstance. Joe is paralyzed from a degenerative nerve condition, which is part of a Gulf War Syndrome. It is a chronic, multi-symptom illness believed to be caused by toxic chemicals.

    In an interview Joe stated, “ I just can’t imagine some veterans out there who don’t have anybody and I don’t know what they would do,” he explains. “Now I know why there are homeless veterans because it all comes down to friends and family. I doesn’t just affect me, it effects everybody, you know, my wife, my family, my mother, my father, my sisters and brothers; it just goes down the line.”
     
  • Kyle Hockenberry

    US Army SPC
    Kyle
    Hockenberry

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    SPC Kyle Hockenberry’s tattoo etched on his torso says it all about this wounded hero, “For those I love, I will sacrifice.” They are powerful words carried close to the heart of Kyle who sacrificed so much for his family, friends, community, and all of us fortunate enough to claim the United States as home. On June 15, 2011, a blast from an improvised explosive device (IED) cost him most of both legs and his left arm. And yet Kyle still stated, “I just always wanted to fight for my country; I’d do it all over again if I could.”

    Now that he is back home in the USA it is our turn to show the same devotion and dedication as Kyle. Kyle’s uncle said, “He’s real humble. He really doesn’t like the word ‘hero.’ So we call him our miracle.” For the remainder of us, the Hockeberry Family Miracle is our American Hero. We honor and pay tribute to his heroic efforts and hope that our efforts bring him Home in the truest sense of the word.
  • Michael Schlitz

    US Army SFC (R)
    Michael
    Schlitz

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    SFC Michael Schlitz and his crew were in Baghdad doing a basic road-clearing mission in 2007 to find the IEDs. Schlitz states, “There’s only two ways that happens: either it finds you or you find it first. Unfortunately, if found us that day.” Two artillery shells attached to a propane tank went off and destroyed Schlitz’s truck and threw him away from the blast with his entire body on fire.

    In the years since that life-altering moment, Michael has found himself on a journey that has shaped and motivated him to live life with a special purpose. Michael not only lost his arms and suffered life –threatening burns throughout his body (85%), but he lost his friends in that blast. Michael said, “On the day I got hurt I lost my entire crew. Now, I want to live a better life for them, a life they would be proud of.”
  • BFAB_MichaelNicholson

    USMC Sgt.
    Michael
    Nicholson

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    On July 6, 2011, Sgt. Nicholson was on combat foot patrol when he was injured by an improvised explosive device (IED) in Afghanistan, causing him to lose both legs and his left arm and suffer a brain injury.

    Eight months after arriving at the National Naval Medical Center, Sgt. Michael Nicholson came home to Tampa, Florida greeted by thousands of supporters. At his church, he spoke to the crowd, “I just want to ask for one more thing; please pray for the guys still in Afghanistan right now and for the soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines recovering in Bethesda, San Antonio and Balboa. Pray for the ones who did make it back.”

    After riding in the motorcade from Tampa Airport to his church, which included over 100 patriot Guard Riders, he said, “That still blows my mind. I never expected all those people to show up. I am still awestruck about all of this. They have done so much for me, I wish I could do something for them.”
  • BFAB_JohnMasson

    US Army MSG
    John
    Masson

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    Msg. John Masson is no stranger to serving our Country. He served in the US Army in Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm, in the Indiana Army National Guard, the Ohio Army National Guard and the 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne), and was deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.

    On October 16, 2010, while conducting Village Stability Operations in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, Msg. Masson stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED) and lost three extremities to preserve freedom for us. With the immediate knowledge that he had lost both legs and his dominant arm, he aided his fellow Medical Sergeant and teammates in treating his wounds – actions which clearly saved his life. Masson received the Purple Heart Medal for his injuries and a second Bronze Star medal for his actions in combat.

    Msg. John Masson resides in Fayetteville, NC with his wife Dustina, son Johnathan, daughter Morgan and son Ethan. Just a glimpse of Masson’s body shows how much he lost serving his country. The wounds will change his life forever. Masson says he will walk again. “it’s something I wish could be taped,” Masson says. “The day it happens we could show it right back to the enemy, that you didn’t do anything to this guy. He’s right back, you know?”
  • BFAB_ThomasMcrae

    USMC SSgt.
    Thomas
    McRae

    Home Status:*
    Pre-Planning

    Tom McRae joined the Marines fresh out of school. He served three combat tours in Iraq and was serving on his second tour of duty in Afghanistan as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team leader when he was injured from in improvised explosive device (IED). He was patrolling a Marine patrol base on foot on January 16, 2012 to investigate and explosive threat, when an IED was detonated under him. Both of McRae’s legs and his left arm were amputated, and he sustained injuries this brain and eyes.

    EOD Company Commander Jessie McGinnis Stated, “SSgt. McRae has proven himself to be a top notch team leader, mentor and friend to many of us in the Company. Hard working, tough and extremely selfless, SSgt. McRae is known to go the extra mile to take care of all how serve with him.”

    And Tom also has the greatest love and care for his daughter. Just eight days after the blast when McRae was on a ventilator, his sister Jessica said, “My mom was talking to him his daughter and his heart beat accelerated like he got excited… You can tell that Tom is fighting… I am pretty sure his daughter has a lot to do with that.” We are pretty sure his daughter, Aidan has everything to do with his fighting spirit.
  • BFAB_BenTomlinson

    USMC Sgt.
    Ben
    Tomlinson

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    Sgt. Ben Tomilinson’s first war journey occurred in 2009, in Afghanistan, when he was hit by shrapnel from a mortar that struck a nearby building. Tomlinson returned to Afghanistan in November 2010 for another seven month stint. It was then that he was injured standing on a rooftop in an Afghanistan village as troops searched for bomb-making materials and weapons. Shot through the upper back and left gasping for breath after a bullet ripped through his chest, Ben wasn’t afraid of dying. Paralyzed from the chest down, Tomlinson was haunted by the idea that people back home wouldn’t remember him, that they wouldn’t even know he was hurt. “That’s the worst fear for everyone who gets deployed,” said Tomlinson who now uses a wheelchair. “It’s that no one is thinking about them.”

    Tomlinson’s hometown of Jacksonville, Alabama, made sure he wouldn’t feel forgotten, and staged a welcome home celebration veterans groups say should be a national model now that the fighting has ended in Iraq. Tomlinson said the lavish homecoming in the city of 7,700 people inspired him to work harder on his rehabilitation. “This is not the way I am going to be forever,” said Tomlinson, 24. He’s getting stronger little by little, his biceps filling out after months of shuttling between hospitals and doctors appointments, and he’s hopeful of walking again one day.
  • BFAB_MarkLitynski

    USMC Cpl.
    Mark
    Litynski

    Home Status:*
    Design Phase

    Cpl Mark Litynski always wanted to be in the Marine Corps, so after a year in college he decided to enlist, despite leaving behind his girlfriend Heather whom he knew he would miss. After two years and a Marine expedition deployment, Mark and Heather were married.

    During Mark’s second deployment in Afghanistan, he volunteered to be the point man on a foot patrol, where on November 19, 2010 he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED). He suffered a bilateral above knee amputation and amputation of his left forearm.

    Two months after his injury, he was up and walking on his first set of prosthetics. Mark valiantly served in Afghanistan, delivering and wreaking havoc on the Taliban, and continues to be an inspiration to many with his positive attitude and fast paced healing. Mark doesn’t for a moment regret his decision to enlist in the Marines. He served, he said, “To make a difference, not just for the United States, our citizens, but over there—we were making a difference for the people of Afghanistan. I wouldn’t change it for anything.”
  • BFAB_TaylorMorris

    US Navy EOD2
    Taylor
    Morris

    Home Status:*
    Pre-Planning

    Taylor Morris was an Explosive Ordinance Disposal Tech, leading a team in Afghanistan, when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED). It exploded underneath him and blew off all four of his limbs. Taylor recalled the moment in an interview, “As soon as I stepped on it, I knew. There was a moment, and then I heard the blast. I felt the heat. I knew I had lost my legs. As I summersaulted through the air, I watched my legs fly off.”

    Even though Taylor was bleeding to death, he told oncoming medics NOT to come to get him. Putting their safety in front of his own life, he stated, “If there were other mines out there, the medics wouldn’t see them or detect them unless it was cleared properly. I knew I had arterial bleeding from all 4 limbs and I was bleeding out fast. I told my buddies to stop, it would only hurt me more if somebody stepped on another one.”

    Furth in the interview Taylor was asked, “If you could have anything in the world, what would it be?” Taylor paused and finally spoke, “I’ve always dreamed of having a log cabin in the woods on a lake, a traditional wood cabin on the outside with a modern interior.”
  • BFAB_TravisMills

    US Army SSG
    Travis
    Mills

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    “Help my soldiers,” Travis Mills yelled several times at a medic, only minutes after he had his legs and arms blown off after stepping on an improvised explosive device (IED). That is just his way, a bigger than life kind of guy, calling the shots, despite his own life threatening injuries, protecting and caring for his men.

    Travis, a weapons squad leader, headed out with two dozen soldiers and an explosive ordinance disposal team on April 10, 2012. They approached an abandoned Afghanistan National Army security post, which consisted of two portable buildings. Soon after entering the buildings they suspected were being used by Taliban forces to make explosives, a bomb exploded underneath him causing him to lose both arms, both legs.

    Travis has a no-nonsense approach to the devastating injuries he sustained. “Life’s hard, and this kind of stuff happens,” stated Mills. “I’ve always been positive, I’ve always been motivated. I have to get better. I got a wife and child to take care of.”
  • BFAB_BenjaminHarrow

    US Army CPT
    Benjamin
    Harrow

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    Cpt. Ben Harrow, US Army, is an accomplished officer, a leader of Army “Green Beret” soldiers, and a decorated American Hero. Motivated by duty, honor, and country, Ben attended the United States Military Academy at West Point and received the “Unsung Hero” award his senior year. Cpt. Harrow has always been self-motivated, demonstrating purposefulness in every endeavor. In 2006, he emerged as Infantry Platoon Leader and prepared for his first 15 month combat deployment to Iraq. Ben earned the rank of Captain and fulfilled his duties as an adept commander of Unconventional Warfare units in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In 2008, Ben married his hometown sweetheart, Gina. In 2010, he and Gina became the proud parents of a newborn son, Peyton. Life could not have been better.

    On May 15, 2010, Ben’s life would be forever changed. Once again deployed to Afghanistan, Ben was leading a team of Green Berets on an anti-terrorism mission, when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED). In the wake of the blast, Ben’s training took over as he had only enough time to hand his medical pouch to his medic before passing out and fighting for his life. Ben lost both legs above the knee, a large portion of flesh from his right forearm, and two fingers.

    Having never trained for such circumstances in his life, Ben has relied on Gina’s strength to pull him through, get him off the pain medications, and provide him the motivation he needs to continue his rehabilitation.
  • BFAB_DougVitale

    USMC Cpl.
    Doug
    Vitale

    Home Status:*
    Completed

    Cpl. Doug Vitale and his wife, Alexis, had their lives turned upside down on September 25, 2011 when he was seriously injured be an improvised explosive device (IED) explosion. He suffered amputations of both legs as well as a severe traumatic brain injury.

    Doug is a 2005 graduate of Kiski Area High School and native of Vandergrift, Pennsylvania, where he was a member of the football and wrestling teams. Doug joined the Marine Corps in October 2007, and being in the infantry was the only thing he wanted to do. On September 25, 2011, while leading his squad on patrol in Sangrin Afghanistan, Cpl. Vitale stepped on an IED pressure plate and lost both of his legs above the knee and suffered stroked on both sides of his brain. He would have never made it home to his family if it was not for the valiant effort of his Marines in the field, who put their lives second in order to get Doug to safety.

    Doug is now a part of the Polytrauma Rehabilitation program for brain injury at the James A. Haley VA Hospital in Tampa, FL where he continues rigorous therapy. Doug was left unable to speak or effectively communicate, and unable to move his body appropriately, but his spirit soars on. His sense of humor is right where he left it and he understands much of what is going on around him.

    Doug and his wife plan to return to their hometown of Pittsburgh, PA in the next year or two. Doug continues on everyday with determination and hope.
  • BFAB_TravisGreen

    USMC GySgt.
    Travis
    Green

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    Gunnery Sgt. Travis Green enlisted in 1999 after recovering from injuries from a car accident. After graduating from marine combat training and Air Traffic control School in 2000, Travis proceeded to Okinawa, Japan. When attached to Marine Air Control Squadron (MACS-1) in Yuma, Arizona, Travis was deployed in January 2003 to Kuwait during the initial invasion of Iraq. In July 2004, he was deployed to Iraq with MACS-1 where he received a Navy Achievement Medal for his accomplishments. While in Iraq, Travis volunteered and was accepted into the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD ) program where he received training to neutralize unexploded ordnance (UXO) and improvised explosive devices along with other disciplines. He was then deployed to Afghanistan in April 2011. He was injured while under fire near Kajaki Dam shortly before he was scheduled to return home.

    While serving his country, Travis has demonstrated the true meaning of “volunteerism”, by actively using his passion and skills to perform necessary services. In Kuwait, Travis took on a multitude of responsibilities in addition to his Air Traffic Control duties and volunteered to remain behind as rear area security for his Squadron.

    In his career GySgt. Green has completed 3 combat deployments along with numerous non-combat and training deployments. He has planned and participated in hundreds of EOD operations within the U.S. and abroad. He has neutralized countless UXO’s and hazardous devices, sometimes while coordinating with various civilian agencies and other branches of Military service, at home and overseas.
  • BFAB_RustyDunagan

    US Army SGT
    Rusty
    Dunagan

    Home Status:*
    Under Construction

    Rusty Lee Dunagan originally of Guthrie, Oklahoma, always knew he would join the military, but after the 2001 attack his conviction grew stronger. In 2006 he decided to join the Army. On September 22, 2010, Rusty was on a patrol in Afghanistan when he encountered an IED, causing him to lose both legs and his left arm. Since that day, he has overcome serious infections and endured over thirty surgeries. Rusty is a married father and stepfather. Angie, his wife, gave birth to their baby daughter, a few months before he was deployed. Rusty was on his second overseas tour of duty when he was wounded.

    Being asked more than once why he had such a positive attitude, Rusty’s reply was that, “I am grateful to be alive and God must have a reason for me to still be here. I know this will be a challenge but I plan on getting some prosthetic legs, get to walking and get back to my family.”
  • BFAB_RustyDunagan

    USMC Cpl.
    Christian
    Brown

    Home Status:*
    Pre-Planning

    Corporal Christian A. Brown was born on November 11, 1983 in Tupelo, MS. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on April 12, 2009 and was deployed to Marjah, Afghanistan, during one of the most notable surges in OIF/OEF history. He returned home safely from his first deployment in July of 2010. A year later he redeployed to the Hemland Province of Afghanistan, and was shortly moved to the cities of Sangin and Kajaki, where he endured several firefights before being injured. During his second deployment, he led 163 combat missions as a squad leader, which was unheard of as a LCpl. As a result, LCpl. Brown was meritoriously promoted to Cpl. While in country.

    On December 13, 2011, Cpl. Brown stepped on an IED (improvised explosive device) in Kajaki, Afghanistan and was severely wounded. He sustained multi-trauma to both hands and arms, amputation of his right leg below the hip joint, left leg amputation above the knee, internal injuries, and blast wounds to his upper left leg. He was in a drug-induced coma for about a month.
  • BFAB_RustyDunagan

    Staff Sgt.
    Jason
    Ross

    Home Status:
    Pre-Planning

    Jason, a native of Livermore, Cal., and graduate of Granada High School, joined the United States Marine Corps in 2001. After returning from a tour in Japan in 2004, he reenlisted to a new field — explosive ordnance disposal (EOD). After completing his training, Jason was sent to Okinawa, where he honed his skills for a few years. Later he was deployed to Afghanistan twice between 2009 and 2011. As an EOD specialist in Afghanistan, Jason put his life on the line day in and day out to protect our country’s freedom.
     
    In March 2011, Jason nearly paid the ultimate price when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He survived the blast, but lost both of his legs, and part of his pelvic bone. Since the incident, he has lived life in and out of the hospital for more than three years, undergoing over 200 surgeries. Jason was treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., and later transferred to the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Cal., in October 2011. He was finally able to return to his hometown of Livermore for the first time in 2013.
     
    Jason is able to move about using a Paramobile, a wheelchair-like device that allows him to remain upright as if standing. The High Five Tour 2014 is raising funds to build a “smart home” for Jason and his family. His “smart home” will be designed to cater to his unique needs, creating an even greater sense of independence and a positive environment in which he can raise his two daughters.
  • BFAB_RustyDunagan

    Cpl.
    Nick
    Kimmel

    Home Status:
    Pre-Planning

    Bio Coming Soon.
  • Jerral Hancock

    SPC
    Jerral
    Hancock

    Home Status:
    Pre-Planning

    Bio Coming Soon.
  • BFAB_RustyDunagan

    Anonymous Hero
    in San Antonio, TX

    Home Status:
    Complete

     

*constructed through our Building for America's Bravest partner program
**constructed prior to Building for America’s Bravest Program by Tunnel to Towers Foundation with additional Lt. Dan Band fundraising concerts donated and paid for by Gary Sinise

A special thank you to our sponsors:

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